Graduation 2012

Last week I had the privilege of going to the QMU graduation ceremony. This is always a highlight of the year for me but this year was quite unique due to the presence of Susan Boyle who received an honorary degree.

Susan Boyle receives honorary degree from Queen Margaret University Edinburgh

This was publicised across the world (see The Jamaica Observer and The Washington Post) and generated a lot of interest in the graduation. What was particularly interesting was seeing paparazzi upon rubbish bins struggling to get a photograph of Susan. Most unusual!

Paparazzi taking photos of Susan Boyle at graduation

After receiving her honorary degree Susan graciously left to attend other prior engagements. This enabled the focus for the rest of the day to be firmly on the graduating undergraduate and postgraduate students of 2012.

I find it particularly special to see students whom I have taught or supervised successfully complete their studies. Among those graduating were the following MBA students.

L-R, Gwenmarie Ewing; Ian Elliott; Giovana Polla

L-R, Ian Elliott; Ros Standish

Among the topics researched from a public services perspective were the following:

Ros Standish, MBA (Healthcare Management), with distinction:

“Change management in acute care: perspectives from therapists’ in non-management roles.”

Abstract:

Previous research into the continuing professional development (CPD) of allied health staff professionals (AHP’s) in Scotland identified change management as a topic which AHP disciplines sought to learn more about. The knowledge and understanding of change management by therapists in non-management roles has not been widely researched, with many former studies focussed on allied health staff in management roles. This research dissertation aimed to investigate the thoughts and knowledge of physiotherapists and occupational therapists on the topic of change management, to understand how they perceive change management relates to their current roles and to identify any future training needs. Using a phenomenological approach, 13 individual semi-structured interviews were conducted and a selection of job descriptions of posts in acute care were reviewed. Two understandings of change management were reported by participants and similarities in change management training needs were noted between clinicians who had similar roles, across different bandings.    

 Amanda Forte, Executive Masters in Public Services Management:

“Organisational change management in a Middle Eastern Culture”

Abstract:

The purpose of this dissertation is to examine how the perceptions of ‘change agents’ in a Middle Eastern organisation impact on the implementation of organizational changes.  The research undertaken consisted of interviews with ‘change agents’ in one particular organisation which had been the subject of various changes since its establishment.  Interviews were conducted at a time when a new change initiative was being initiated with a defined purpose and goal. 

Interviews examined how the main ‘change agents’ perceived the need for change and how they managed this within their own areas.  The research also examined whether there were specific issues which were experienced, within the context of the Middle East, by ‘change agents’ applying western concepts of the management of change.

The research concluded that, the perceptions of the ‘change agents’ did have a significant impact on the management and implementation of change strategies.  The research shows that ‘change agents’ agreement to the need for change is important, but the articulation of the scope and depth of the change to be led by individuals is of equal importance.  Similarly the authority of those leading change must be clearly defined and understood as any ambiguity in the perception of subordinates will impact on their willingness to initiate or implement any changes across the organisation.

New public services programme

An increasing number of students from the public services area are showing an interest in issues of leading and managing change. This is hardly surprising as ‘change’ is increasingly being perceived by politicians as a panacea. Yet the implementation of change is incredibly difficult due to the  human side of ‘transformation’; the nature of organisational culture; and the nature of public services.

It is with this in mind that we have amended our programmes so that our new undergraduate suite has a module on leading change and our postgraduate public services governance course has a module on leading change in the public services.

This September we will be enrolling students onto our new public services governance course and our new MBA suite. These new programmes have taken a considerable amount of effort from all staff and have included feedback from former students and employers. To find out more about the new programmes click here.

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